How to keep arthritis from turning into diabetes

December 22, 2012
Volume 2    |   Issue 100
Did you know that one particular type of arthritis makes you about 50% more likely to develop diabetes? What's more, if the cause behind the link is accurate, then just about any type of severe arthritis could make you susceptible to diabetes.

Researchers have known about the link between rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes for years. Many studies have shown the connection. But now these researchers are beginning to understand why this form of arthritis increases your risk of diabetes. It's inflammation.

As you may know, rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that leads to inflammation in the joints and surrounding areas. It also can affect your organs, including your pancreas. This inflammation can create insulin resistance. And insulin resistance can increase your blood sugar levels, which leads to diabetes.

Rheumatoid arthritis isn't the only form of arthritis that creates inflammation, though. Osteoarthritis also causes it. But osteoarthritis doesn't usually cause as much inflammation because it's typically more localized and not as severe. Osteoarthritis is the "wear-and-tear" arthritis because it affects joints that are worn down. However, more and more research is pointing to inflammation as a possible cause and result of osteoarthritis. So it's vital you treat inflammation regardless of the type of arthritis you have.

Conventional doctors see the need for treating inflammation. Unfortunately, they typically turn to drugs. If you have rheumatoid arthritis, your doctor may prescribe a TNF-alpha inhibitor. As its name indicates, these drugs block TNF-alpha, an inflammation-causing substance in your body that also can lead to diabetes. A recent study on 1,500 rheumatoid arthritis patients found that the drug does indeed reduce your risk of diabetes. But, like many drugs, it does so with great risk. TNF-alpha inhibitors can decrease your immune function. Since rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease, it doesn't make sense to take a drug that could make the problem worse in the long run.

Instead, consider treating your inflammation naturally. Many herbs and nutrients can reduce inflammation as well as, if not better than, most drugs. So consider taking turmeric, green tea, rosemary, holy basil, ginger, Chinese skullcap, celery seed, and barberry before taking a dangerous drug. They may help reduce your pain and inflammation and prevent diabetes at the same time. And they work without any side effects. You can get all of these and other nutrients in one powerful anti-inflammatory supplement called Reduloxin.

If you're in chronic pain, it's also important to keep active. Another suspected link between arthritis and diabetes is the sedentary lifestyle the pain often creates. When you're in pain, it's hard to keep moving. But you may find the movement helps reduce the pain. If that's not the case for you and you can't exercise enough to burn off your excess blood sugar, then you should consider taking a supplement that helps balance your blood sugar levels and may help you prevent diabetes.

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Alpha-lipoic acid, cinnamon, chromium, and many other nutrients and herbs can help reduce your sugar cravings and bring your blood sugar into balance. Again, you can find all of these in one supplement called Metabolic Defense. Taken with Reduloxin, you'll have a powerful one-two punch against your pain and diabetes.

Your insider for better health,

Steve Kroening

Steve Kroening is the editor of Nutrient Insider, a twice-a-week email newsletter that brings you the latest healing breakthroughs from the world of nutrition and dietary supplements. For over 20 years, Steve has worked hand-in-hand with some of the nation's top doctors, including Drs. Robert Rowen, Frank Shallenberger, Nan Fuchs, William Campbell Douglass, and best-selling author James Balch. Steve is the author of the book Practical Guide to Home Remedies. As a health journalist, Steve's articles have appeared in countless magazines, blogs, and websites.

Source:

http://www.everydayhealth.com/rheumatoid-arthritis/the-link-between-rheumatoid-arthritis-and-diabetes.aspx?xid=aol_eh-arth_4_20121008_&aolcat=AJA&ncid=webmail13

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About Steve Kroening, ND


For over 25 years, Editor-In-Chief Steve Kroening has worked hand-in-hand with some of the nation's top doctors, including Drs. Frank Shallenberger, Janet Zand, Nan Kathryn Fuchs, William Campbell Douglass, and best-selling author James Balch. Steve is the author of the book Practical Guide to Home Remedies. As a health journalist, Steve's articles have appeared in countless magazines, blogs, and websites.

Steve researches breakthrough cures and treatments you won't hear about from mainstream medicine or even other "alternative" writers. He writes in a friendly, easy-to-read style that always gives you the power to guide your own health choices and do more research on your own.