Connecting Alzheimer’s to Diabetes and Inflammation

February 5, 2018


I've told you before that Alzheimer's is now considered type-3 diabetes. That's because there's growing evidence that insulin deficiency and insulin resistance could cause Alzheimer's-type damage. Now research finds part of the connection between type-2 diabetes and Alzheimer's. And it could lead to a way to slow the progression of this largely untreatable disease.

Scientists in Germany found that the brain's immune system produces an inflammatory mechanism, which drives the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The only reason the immune system produces inflammation is to fight foreign invaders, such as bugs (bacteria, viruses, etc.) and toxic chemicals, and to help heal injuries. 

In the case of diabetes, high blood sugar causes chronic inflammation that leads to insulin resistance. So it's very possible high blood sugar is causing the chronic inflammation that leads to Alzheimer's as well.

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In fact, another study found that while there's not a direct connection from type-2 diabetes to Alzheimer's, there is a strong correlation. In other words, type-2 diabetes doesn't appear to cause Alzheimer's, but rather the two illnesses are very closely related. That's why Alzheimer's is considered type-3 diabetes and not a symptom or progression of type-2 diabetes. It looks like the brain responds a little differently to high blood sugar than the rest of the body. Nonetheless, the result is an immune response that produces chronic inflammation.

And it's this inflammation that leads to neurodegeneration. This, of course, led the scientists to begin thinking about possible drugs to treat the condition. But there are already some fantastic nutrients you can take to treat the double-edged sword of high blood sugar and inflammation.

High blood sugar is best dealt with through your diet. Eating less sugar and refined carbohydrates, plus getting plenty of exercise can go a long way toward protecting the neurons in your brain. But it helps to take nutrients, such as those in Advanced Blood Sugar Formula, that can help promote healthy blood sugar levels and normal insulin sensitivity throughout your body, including your brain.

As for the inflammation, some doctors think you can take an NSAID, such as ibuprofen, to lower your inflammation levels. But the side effects aren't worth it. Instead, focus on nutrients that both fight the inflammation and heal whatever is causing the inflammation. I've found that the nutrients in Reduloxin do both quite effectively. Using both supplements could help you prevent and maybe even fight Alzheimer's, especially if you start taking them early.

Your insider for better health,

Sources:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/12/171220131656.htm.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2769828/.

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For over 25 years, Editor-In-Chief Steve Kroening has worked hand-in-hand with some of the nation's top doctors, including Drs. Frank Shallenberger, Janet Zand, Nan Kathryn Fuchs, William Campbell Douglass, and best-selling author James Balch. Steve is the author of the book Practical Guide to Home Remedies. As a health journalist, Steve's articles have appeared in countless magazines, blogs, and websites.

Steve researches breakthrough cures and treatments you won't hear about from mainstream medicine or even other "alternative" writers. He writes in a friendly, easy-to-read style that always gives you the power to guide your own health choices and do more research on your own.